Utente:Monozigote/La Coscienza di Levinas/Bibliografia

Emmanuel Levinas

BIBLIOGRAFIA SCELTAModifica

(I testi di Primo Levi e di Emmanuel Levinas sono stati consultati nelle rispettive traduzioni inglesi)

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  • Arendt, Hannah. Eichmann and the Holocaust. London: Penguin Books, 2005.
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  • Alford, C. Fred. “Levinas, Winnicott, and Therapy.” The Psychoanalytic Review 94, no. 4 (2007): 529–551.
  • Alford, C. Fred. “Winnicott and Trauma.” Psychoanalysis, Culture & Society 18, no. 3 (2013): 259–276.
  • Aron, Lewis, and Karen Starr. A Psychotherapy for the People: Toward a Progressive Psychoanalysis. New York: Routledge, 2013.
  • Atterton, Peter. “ ‘The Talking Cure’: The Ethics of Psychoanalysis.” Psychoanalytic Review 94 (2007): 553–576.
  • Bakan, David. Sigmund Freud and the Jewish Mystical Tradition. London: Free Association Books, 1990.
  • Barnard, Suzanne. “Diachrony, Tuchè, and the Ethical Subject in Levinas and Lacan.” In Psychology for the Other: Levinas Ethics and the Practice of Psychology, edited by Edwin E. Gantt and Richard N. Williams, 160–181. Pittsburgh, PA: Duquesne University Press, 2002.
  • Bellah, Robert N., Richard Madsen, William M. Sullivan, Ann Swidler, and Steven M. Tipton. Habits of the Heart: Individualism and Commitment in American Life. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1985.
  • Bergo, Bettina. “Levinas’s ‘Ontology’ 1935–1974.” In Emmanuel Levinas, edited by Claire Elize Katz and Lara Trout, Levinas and the History of Philosophy, 25–48. New York: Routledge, 2005.
  • Bettelheim, Bruno. Surviving and Other Essays. New York: Vintage Books, 1980.
  • Binkley, Sam. “Happiness, Positive Psychology and the Program of Neoliberal Governmentality.” Subjectivity 4 (2011): 371–394.
  • Birrell, Pamela J. “An Ethic of Possibility: Relationship, Risk, and Presence.” Ethics & Behavior 16, no. 2 (2006): 95–115.
  • Bloechl, Jeffrey. “The Difficulty of Being: A Partial Reading of E. Levinas, De l’existence a` l’existant.” European Journal of Psychotherapy, Counseling and Health 7, no. 1–2 (2005): 77–87.
  • Bloechl, Jeffrey. “Psychoanalytic Practice, Ethics and Religion. A Lacanian Perspective.” In Psychology and the Other: A Dialogue at the Crossroad of an Emerging Field, edited by David Goodman and Mark Freeman, 146–159. New York: Oxford University Press, 2014.
  • Blondel, Charles. Introduction à la Psychologie Collective. Paris, France: A. Colin, 1928.
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  • Burston, Daniel, and Roger Frie. Psychotherapy as a Human Science. Pittsburgh, PA: Duquesne University Press, 2006.
  • Butler, Judith. Giving an Account of Oneself. New York: Fordham University Press, 2005.
  • Butler, Judith. Precarious Life: The Powers of Mourning and Violence. London: Verso, 2004.
  • Butler, Judith. Senses of the Subject. New York: Fordham University Press, 2015.
  • Christopher, John, Dennis Wendt, Jeanne Marecek, and David Goodman. “Critical Cultural Awareness: Contributions to a Globalizing Psychology.” American Psychologist 69, no. 7 (2014): 645–655.
  • Cohen, Richard A. “Emmanuel Levinas: Judaism and the Primacy of the Ethical.” In The Cambridge Companion to Modern Jewish Philosophy, edited by Michael Morgan and Peter Eli Gordon, 234−255. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007.
  • Cohen, Richard A. Ethics, Exegesis and Philosophy: Interpretation aer Levinas. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001.
  • Cohen, Richard. Ethics, Exegesis and Philosophy: Interpretation after Levinas. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2001.
  • Cohen, Richard. “Maternal Psyche.” In Psychology for the Other: Levinas, Ethics, and the Practice of Psychology, edited by Edwin E. Gantt and Richard N. Williams, 32–64. Pittsburgh, PA: Duquesne University Press, 2002.
  • Cohen, Richard. “Preface.” In Psychotherapy for the Other: Levinas and the Face-to-Face Relationship, edited by Kevin C. Krycka, George Kunz, and George Sayre, vii–xiv. Pittsburgh, PA: Duquense University Press, 2015.
  • Corpt, Elizabeth. “The Art and Craft of Psychoanalytic Practice: A Discussion of Orange’s ‘Speaking the Unspeakable: “The Implicit,” Traumatic Living Memory, and the Dialogue of Metaphors.’” International Journal of Psychoanalysis Self Psychology 6, no. 2 (2011): 214–227.
  • Corpt, Elizabeth. “The Complications of Caring and the Ethical Turn in Psychoanalysis.” In The Ethical Turn: Otherness and Subjectivity in Contemporary Psychoanalysis, edited by David Goodman and Eric Severson, 101–116. New York: Routledge, 2016.
  • Critchley, Simon. Ethics-Politics-Subjectivity: Essays on Derrida, Levinas, and Contemporary French Thought. New York: Verso, 1999.
  • Critchley, Simon. Infinitely Demanding: Ethics of Commitment, Politics of Resistance. New York: Verso, 2007.
  • Critchley, Simon. The Problem with Levinas. Edited by Alexix Dianda. New York: Oxford University Press, 2015.
  • Cushman, Philip. Constructing the Self, Constructing America: A Cultural History of Psychotherapy. Garden City, NY: Da Capo Press, 1995.
  • Cushman, Philip, and Peter Gilford. “Will Managed Care Change Our Way of Being?” American Psychologist 55, no. 9 (2000): 985–996.
  • Danziger, Kurt. Constructing the Subject: Historical Origins of Psychological Research. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990.
  • Derrida, Jacques. Acts of Religion. Edited by Gil Anidjar. New York: Routledge, 2002.
  • Derrida, Jacques. “To Forgive: The Unforgivable and the Imprescriptible.” In Questioning God, edited by John Caputo, Mark Dooley, and Michael Scanlon, 21−51. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2001.
  • Dostoyevsky, Fyodor. The Brothers Karamazov, Volume 1. Translated by David Magarshack. Harmondsworth, UK: Penguin, 1967.
  • Doukhan, Abi. Emmanuel Levinas: A Philosophy of Exile. London: Bloomsbury, 2014.
  • Dueck, Alvin, and David Goodman. “Expiation, Substitution and Surrender: Levinasian Implications for Psychotherapy.” Pastoral Psychology 55, no. 5 (2007): 601–617.
  • Dummett, Michael. Frege: Philosophy of Language. New York: Harper & Row, 1973.
  • Fackenheim, Emil L. “Holocaust.” In A Holocaust Reader: Responses to the Nazi Extermination, edited by Michael Morgan, 122−130. New York: Oxford University Press, 2001.
  • Fackenheim, Emil L. “The Holocaust and Philosophy.” In A Holocaust Reader: Responses to the Nazi Extermination, edited by Michael Morgan, 250−258. New York: Oxford University Press, 2001.
  • Frankl, Viktor E. Manʼs Search for Meaning: The Classic Tribute to Hope from the Holocaust. London: Rider, 2004.
  • Frank, Arthur. The Renewal of Generosity: Illness, Medicine, and How to Live. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2004.
  • Freeman, Mark. “Thinking and Being Otherwise: Aesthetics, Ethics, Erotics.” Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 32, no. 4 (2012): 196–208.
  • Freeman, Mark. The Priority of the Other: Thinking and Living beyond the Self. New York: Oxford University Press, 2014.
  • Freud, Sigmund. Civilization and Its Discontents. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2005. (Das Ubenhagen in der Kultur. Austria: Internationaler Psychoanalytischer Verlag Wien, 1930)
  • Frie, Roger, and Donna Orange (eds.). Beyond Postmodernism: New Dimensions in Clinical Theory and Practice. New York: Routledge, 2009.
  • Fromm, Erich. The Sane Society. New York: Henry Holt and Company, LLC, 1955.
  • Fryer, David. Intervention of the Other: Ethical Subjectivity in Levinas and Lacan. New York: Other Press, 2004.
  • Fryer, David. “What Levinas and Psychoanalysis Can Teach Each Other, or How to Be a Mensch without Going Meshugah.” Psychoanalytic Review 94, no. 4 (2007): 577–594.
  • Gantt, Edwin E. “Levinas, Psychotherapy, and the Ethics of Suffering.” Journal of Humanistic Psychology 40, no. 8 (2000): 9–28.
  • Gantt, Edwin E., and Richard N. Williams. Psychology for the Other: Levinas, Ethics, and the Practice of Psychology. Pittsburgh, PA: Duquesne University Press, 2002.
  • Gay, Peter. A Godless Jew: Freud, Atheism and the Making of Psychoanalysis. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1987.
  • Gergen, Kenneth J., Ruthellen Josselson, and Mark Freeman. “The Promises of Qualitative Inquiry.” American Psychologist 70, no. 1 (2015): 1–9. doi:10.1037/a0038597
  • Goodman, David. The Demanded Self: Levinasian Ethics and Identity in Psychology. Pittsburgh, PA: Duquesne University Press, 2012.
  • Goodman, David. “Hearing ‘Thou Shall Not Kill’ When All the Evidence Is to the Contrary: Psychoanalysis, Enactment, and Jewish Ethics.” In Answering a Question with a Question: Contemporary Psychoanalysis and Jewish Thought, edited by Lewis Aron and Libby Henik, 129–152. Brighton, MA: Academic Studies Press, 2010.
  • Goodman, David. “The McDonaldization of Psychotherapy: Processed Foods, Processed Therapies, and Economic Class.” Theory & Psychology 26, no. 1 (2015): 77–95.
  • Goodman, David, and Mark Freeman, editors. Psychology and the Other. New York: Oxford University Press, 2015.
  • Goodman, David, and Lynne Layton. “The Historical-Political in Psychoanalysis’ Ethical Turn.” Psychoanalysis, Culture, and Society 19, no. 3 (2014): 225–231.
  • Goodman, David, and Eric Severson (eds.). The Ethical Turn: Otherness and Subjectivity in Contemporary Psychoanalysis. New York: Routledge, 2016.
  • Glover, Jonathan. Humanity: A Moral History of the Twentieth Century. London: Pimlico, 2001.
  • Grossman, Vasily. Life and Fate. Translated by Robert Chandler. London: The Harvill Press, 1995.
  • Grossman, Vasily. A Writer at War: Vasily Grossman with the Red Army 1941–1945. Translated and edited by Antony Beevor and Luba Vinogradova. London: Pimlico, 2006.
  • Halling, Steen. “The Implications of Emmanuel Levinas’s Totality and Infinity for Therapy.” In Psychotherapy for the Other: Levinas and the Face-to-Face Relationship, edited by Kevin C. Krycka, George Kunz, and George Sayre, 19–40. Pittsburgh, PA: Duquense University Press, 2015.
  • Hamblet, Wendy C. “A Pathological Goodness: Emmanuel Levinasʼs Post-Holocaust Ethics.” Minerva 10 (2006): 172−196.
  • Handelman, Susan A. Fragments of Redemption: Jewish Thought & Literary Theory in Benjamin, Scholem, & Levinas. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1991.
  • Harrington, David R. “A Levinasian Psychology? Perhaps.” In Psychology for the Other: Levinas, Ethics, and the Practice of Psychology, edited by Edwin Gantt and Richard N. Williams, 209–224. Pittsburgh, PA: Duquesne University Press, 2002.
  • Hatley, James. Suering Witness: The Quandary of Responsibility aer the Irreparable. New York: State University of New York Press, 2000.
  • Hoffman, Irwin. “Our Way to ‘Scientific’ Legitimacy: The Desiccation of Human Experience.” Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association 57, no. 5(2009): 1043–1069. doi:10.1177/0003065109343925
  • Huett, Steven D., and David Goodman. “Levinas on Managed Care: The (A)proximal, Faceless Third-Party and the Psychotherapeutic Dyad.” Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 32, no. 2 (2012): 86–102.
  • Hutchens, B. C. “Is Levinas Relevant to Psychoanalysis?” Psychoanalytic Review 94, no. 4 2007): 595–616.
  • Kigel, Michael. “Translatorʼs Notes.” In Salomon Malka, Emmanuel Levinas: His Life and Legacy, translated by M.
  • Kigel and S. M. Embree, xiii–xxvi Pittsburgh, PA: Duquesne University Press, 2006.
  • Klagge, James (ed.). Wittgenstein and Biography. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001.
  • Kearney, Richard. The Hermeneutics of Wounds. Plenary Address at the Psychology and the Other Conference, Cambridge, MA, 2015.
  • Kearney, Richard, and Brian Treanor. Carnal Hermeneutics. New York: Fordham University Press, 2015.
  • Kirschner, Suzanne, and Jack Martin (eds.). The Sociocultural Turn in Psychology: The Contextual Emergence of Mind and Self. New York: Columbia University Press, 2010.
  • Krycka, Kevin C., George Kunz, and George G. Sayre (eds.). Psychotherapy for the Other: Levinas and the Face-to-Face Relationship. Pittsburgh, PA: Duquense University Press, 2015.
  • Kunz, George. The Paradox of Power and Weakness: Levinas and an Alternative Paradigm for Psychology. New York: State University of New York Press, 1998.
  • Kunz, George. “An Analysis of the Psyche Inspired by Emmanuel Levinas.” Psychoanalytic Review 94 (2007): 617–638.
  • Kunz, George, Kevin, C., Krycka, C., and George G. Sayre. “Introduction.” In Psychotherapy for the Other: Levinas and the Face-to-Face Relationship, edited by Kevin C. Krycka, George Kunz, and George Sayre, 1–16. Pittsburgh, PA: Duquense University Press, 2015.
  • Laing, R. D. The Divided Self. New York: Penguin Books, 1969.
  • Lamiell, James T. “On Psychology’s Struggle for Existence: Some Reflections on Wundt’s 1913 Essay a Century on.” Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 33 (2013): 205–215.
  • Larner, Glenn. “Exploring Levinas: The Ethical Self in Family Therapy.” Journal of Family Therapy 30 (2008): 351–361.
  • Layton, Lynne. “Attacks on Linking: The Unconscious Pull to Dissociate Individuals from their Social Context.” In Psychoanalysis, Class and Politics: Encounters in the Clinical Setting, edited by Lynne Layton, Nancy Caro Hollander, and Susan Gutwill, 107–117. New York: Routledge, 2006.
  • Leahey, Thomas H. A History of Psychology: Main Currents in Psychological Thought (6th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall, 2004.
  • Lescourret, Marie-Anne. Emmanuel Levinas. Paris: Flammarion, 1994.
  • Levi, Primo. The Black Hole of Auschwitz. Translated by Sharon Wood and edited by Marco Belpoliti. Cambridge: Polity Press, 2005.
  • Levi, Primo. The Drowned and the Saved. Translated by Raymond Rosenthal. London: Abacus, 1998.
  • Levi, Primo. If This Is a Man/The Truce. Translated by Stuart Woolf. London: Vintage, 1996.
  • Levi, Primo. Moments of Reprieve. Translated by Ruth Feldman. London: Abacus, 1996.
  • Levi, Primo. Survival in Auschwitz: The Nazi Assault on Humanity. Translated by Stuart Woolf. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1996.
  • Levi, Primo (with Ferdinando Camon). Conversations with Primo Levi. Translated by John Shepley. Marlboro, VT: The Marlboro Press, 1987.
  • Levinas, Emmanuel. Alterity & Transcendence. Translated by Michael Smith. New York: Columbia University Press, 1999.
  • Levinas, Emmanuel. “As If Consenting to Horror.” Critical Inquiry 15, no. 2 (1989).
  • Levinas, Emmanuel. Basic Philosophical Writings. Edited by Adriaan Peperzak, Simon Critchley, and Robert Bernasconi. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1996.
  • Levinas, Emmanuel. Diicult Freedom: Essays on Judaism. Translated by Seán Hand. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1997.
  • Levinas, Emmanuel. Entre Nous: Thinking-of-the-Other. Translated by Michael B. Smith and Barbara Harshav. New York: Columbia University Press, 1998.
  • Levinas, Emmanuel. “Ethics of the Infinite.” In Richard Kearney, Dialogues with Contemporary Continental Thinkers: The Phenomenological Heritage, 49−69. Manchester, UK: Manchester University Press, 1984.
  • Levinas, Emmanuel. Ethics and Infinity: Conversations with Philippe Nemo. Translated by Richard Cohen. Pittsburgh, PA: Duquesne University Press, 2001.
  • Levinas, Emmanuel. God, Death, and Time. Translated by Bettina Bergo. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2000.
  • Levinas, Emmanuel. “Emmanuel Levinas.” In Raoul Mortley, French Philosophers in Conversation: Levinas, Schneider, Serres, Irigaray, Le Doeu, Derrida, 11−24. London: Routledge, 1991.
  • Levinas, Emmanuel. Is It Righteous To Be? Interviews with Emmanuel Levinas. Edited by Jill Robbins. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2001.
  • Levinas, Emmanuel. Nine Talmudic Readings. Translated by Annette Aronowicz. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1994.
  • Levinas, Emmanuel. Of God Who Comes to Mind. Translated by Bettina Bergo. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1998.
  • Levinas, Emmanuel. Otherwise Than Being or Beyond Essence. Translated by Alphonso Lingis. Dordrecht, the Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1994.
  • Levinas, Emmanuel. Outside the Subject. Translated by Michael Smith. London: Athlone Press, 1993.
  • Levinas, Emmanuel. “The Paradox of Morality: An Interview with Emmanuel Levinas.” In The Provocation of Levinas: Rethinking the Other, edited by Robert Bernasconi and David Wood, 168−180. London: Routledge, 1988.
  • Levinas, Emmanuel. Time and the Other [and additional essays]. Translated by Richard Cohen. Pittsburgh, PA: Duquesne University Press, 1997.
  • Levinas, Emmanuel. Totality and Infinity: An Essay on Exteriority. Translated by Alphonso Lingis. Pittsburgh, PA: Duquesne University Press, 1996.
  • Macdonald, Heather. Cultural and Critical Exploration in the Community Psychology: The Inner City Intern. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016.
  • Macdonald, Heather, David Goodman, and Brian Becker, editors. Dialogues at the Edge of American Psychological Discourse: Critical and Theoretical Perspectives. London: Palgrave Macmillan UK, 2017.
  • Marcus, Paul. Being for the Other: Emmanuel Levinas, Ethical Living, and Psychoanalysis. Milwaukee, WI: Marquette University Press, 2008.
  • Marcus, Paul. “You Are, Therefore I Am: Emmanuel Levinas and Psychoanalysis.” Psychoanalytic Review 94 (2007): 515–527.
  • Mitchell, Stephen A. and Lewis Aron. Relational Psychoanalysis: The Emergence of a Tradition. Hillsdale, NJ: Taylor & Francis Group, 1999.
  • Malka, Salomon. Emmanuel Levinas: His Life and Legacy. Translated by M. Kigel and S. M. Embree. Pittsburgh, PA: Duquesne University Press, 2006.
  • Morgan, Michael L. The Cambridge Introduction to Emmanuel Levinas. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011.
  • Morgan, Michael L. Discovering Levinas. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007.
  • Nemo, Philippe. “Foreword.” In Salomon Malka Emmanuel Levinas: His Life and Legacy, translated by M. Kigel and S. M. Embree, vii–xii Pittsburgh, PA: Duquesne University Press, 2006.
  • Nietzsche, Friedrich. Beyond Good and Evil: Prelude to a Philosophy of the Future. Translated by R. J. Hollingdale. London: Penguin, 1990.
  • Oppenheim, Michael. Contemporary Psychoanalysis and Modern Jewish Philosophy: Two Languages of Love. New York: Routledge, 2016.
  • Orange, Donna. M. “Is Ethics Masochism? Or Infinite Ethical Responsibility and Finite Human Capacity.” In The Ethical Turn: Otherness and Subjectivity in Contemporary Psychoanalysis, edited by David M. Goodman and Eric R. Severson, 57–74. New York: Routledge, 2016.
  • Orange, Donna M. The Suffering Stranger: Hermeneutics for Everyday Clinical Practice. New York: Routledge, 2011.
  • Orange, Donna M. Thinking for Clinicians: Philosophical Resources for Contemporary Psychoanalysis and the humanistic Psychotherapies. New York: Routledge, 2010.
  • Orange, Donna M. “Toward the Art of the Living Dialogue: Between Constructivism and Hermeneutics in Psychoanalytic Thinking.” In Beyond Postmodernism: New Dimensions in Clinical Theory and Practice, edited by Roger Frie and Donna Orange, 117–142. New York: Routledge, 2009.
  • Pellegrini, Ann. Performance Anxieties: Staging Psychoanalysis, Staging Race. New York: Routledge, 1997.
  • Plant, Bob. “Levinas and the Holocaust: A Reconstruction.” Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 22, no. 1 (2014): 44−79.
  • Plant, Bob. “Welcoming Dogs: Levinas and ʻthe Animalʼ Question.” Philosophy & Social Criticism 37, no. 1 (2011): 49−71.
  • Poiré, Francois, editor. Emmanuel Lévinas: Qui êtes-vous? Lyon, France: La Manufacture, 1987.
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  • Putnam, Hilary. Jewish Philosophy as a Guide to Life: Rosenzweig, Buber, Levinas, Wittgenstein. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2008.
  • Richardson, W. J. “The Irresponsible Subject.” In Ethics as First Philosophy, edited by A. T. Peperzak, 123−131. New York: Routledge, 1995.
  • Richardson, Frank C., Blaine J. Fowers, and Charles B. Guignon. Re-envisioning Psychology: Moral Dimensions of Theory and Practice. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1999.
  • Rieff, Philip. The Triumph of the Therapeutic: Uses of Faith after Freud. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1987.
  • Rosenberg, Charles E. Our Present Complaint: American Medicine, Then and Now. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2007.
  • Rozmarin, Eyal. “An Other in Psychoanalysis: Emmanuel Levinas’s Critique of Knowledge and Analytic Sense.” Contemporary Psychoanalysis 43, no. 3 (2007): 327–360.
  • Ruti, Mari. Between Levinas and Lacan: Self, Other, Ethics. New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2015.
  • Sayre, George. “Toward a Therapy for the Other.” European Journal of Psychotherapy, Counseling and Health 7, nos. 1–2 (2005): 37–47.
  • Seligman, Martin. Authentic Happiness: Using the New Positive Psychology to Realize your Potential for Lasting Fulfillment. New York: Simon and Schuster, 2002.
  • Severson, Eric R. “Beyond Hermeneutics: Levinas, Language and Psychology.” Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 32, no. 4 (2012): 251.
  • Severson, Eric R. “Levinas, Psychology, and Language.” In Psychotherapy for the Other: Levinas and the Face-to-Face Relationship, edited by Kevin C. Krycka, George Kunz, and George Sayre, 41–60. Pittsburgh, PA: Duquense University Press, 2015.
  • Severson, Eric R. “Time and Lament: Levinas and the Impossible Possibility of Therapy.” In Psychology and the Other, edited by David Goodman and Mark Freeman, 17–30. New York: Oxford University Press, 2015.
  • Slife, Brent D., Jeffrey S. Reber, and Frank C. Richardson. Critical Thinking about Psychology: Hidden Assumptions and Plausible Alternatives. Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association, 2005.
  • Slife, Brent D., Brady Wiggins, and Jason T. Graham. “Avoiding an EST Monopoly: Toward a Pluralism of Philosophies and Methods.” Journal of Contemporary Psychotherapy 35, no. 1 (2005): 83–97.
  • Smith, Michael B. Toward the Outside: Concepts and Themes in Emmanuel Levinas. Pittsburgh, PA: Duquesne University Press, 2005.
  • Stolorow, Robert, Atwood, G George, & Orange, Donna. Worlds of Experience: Interweaving Philosophical and Clinical Dimensions in Psychoanalysis. New York: Basic Books, 2002.
  • Tauber, Alfred. Freud: The Reluctant Philosopher. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2010.
  • Taylor, Charles. A Secular Age. Cambridge, MA: The Belknap Press, 2007.
  • Taylor, Charles. Sources of the Self: The Making of the Modern Identity. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1989.
  • Wachtel, Paul L. “Beyond ‘ESTs’: Problematic Assumptions in the Pursuit of Evidence-Based Practice.” Psychoanalytic Psychology 27, no. 3 (2010): 251–272.
  • Walsh, Robert. D. “Beyond Therapy: Levinas and Ethical Therapeutics.” European Journal of Psychotherapy, Counseling and Health 7, no. 1–2 (2005): 29–35.
  • Wiesel, Elie. Night. Translated by Stella Rodway. London: Penguin, 1981.
  • Wiesel, Elie. “A Plea for the Dead.” In A Holocaust Reader: Responses to the Nazi Extermination, edited by Michael Morgan, 67−77. New York: Oxford University Press, 2001.
  • Williams, Richard N. “Levinas and Psychoanalysis: The Radical Turn Outward and Upward.” Psychoanalytic Review 94 (2007): 681–701.
  • Wright, Tamra. “Beyond the ʻEclipse of Godʼ: The Shoah in the Jewish Thought of Buber and Levinas.” In Levinas & Buber: Dialogue & Dierence, edited by Peter Atterton, Mathew Calarco, and Maurice Friedman, 203−225. Pittsburgh, PA: Duquesne University Press, 2004.
  • Wundt, Wilhelm. Die Psychologie im Kampf ums Dasein [Psychology’s Struggle for Existence], Zweite Auflage. Leipzig: Kröner, 1913.
  • Žižek, Slavoj. “Neighbours and Other Monsters: A Plea for Ethical Violence.” In The Neighbor: Three Inquiries in Political Theology, edited by Slavoj Žižek, Eric Santner, e Kenneth Reinhard, 134−190. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2005.
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