Differenze tra le versioni di "Le religioni della Mesopotamia/La letteratura religiosa in Mesopotamia/La Leggenda della nascita di Sargon"

 
===Il testo===
Trascrizione del testo neoassiro di Brian Lewis in ''The Sargon Legend. A Study of the Akkadian Text and the Tale of the Hero Who Was Exposed at Birth'' (ASOR Dissertation Series 4; Cambridge, MA 1980), ripresa in Luigi Santopaolo, ''Il Bambino e Il Fiume'', Roma, Pontificio Istituto Biblico; la traduzione è di Giuseppe Del Monte, in '' Iscrizioni reali dal Vicino Oriente Antico'', Pisa, Università di Pisa, 2004.
 
Trascrizione del testo neoassiro di Brian Lewis in ''The Sargon Legend. A Study of the Akkadian Text and the Tale of the Hero Who Was Exposed at Birth'' (ASOR Dissertation Series 4; Cambridge, MA 1980), ripresa in Luigi Santopaolo, ''Il Bambino e Il Fiume'', Roma, Pontificio Istituto Biblico; unUn'ulteriore trascrizione siè trovareperibile in Joan Goodnick Westenholz, ''Legends of the Kings of Akkade- The Texts''. Eisenbrauns Winona Lake, Indiana 1997. La traduzione è di Giuseppe Del Monte, inmentre ''una Iscrizioni reali dal Vicino Oriente Antico'', Pisa, Università di Pisa, 2004, un'ulterioreseconda traduzione accademica, quella dell'assiriologo statunitense Joan Goodnick Westenholz, è in nota: <ref>Così traduce l'assiriologo statunitense Joan Goodnick Westenholz: {{q|1. Sargon, the mighty king, king of Akkade, am I.<br>2. My mother was an en-priestess(?), my father I never knew.<br>3. My father's brother inhabits the highlands.<br>4. My city is Azupirsnu, which lies on the bank of the Euphrates.<br>5. She conceived me, my en-priestess mother, in concealment she gave me birth,<br>6. She set me in a wicker basket, with bitumen she made my opening watertight,<br>7. She cast me down into the river from which I could not ascend.<br>8. The river bore me, to Aqqi the water-drawer it brought me.<br>9. Aqqi the water-drawer, when lowering his bucket, did lift me up,<br>10. Aqqi the water-drawer did raise me as his adopted son,<br>11. Aqqi the water-drawer did set me to his gardening.<br>12. While I was (still) a gardener, IStar did grow fond of me,<br>13. And so for [. . .I years I did reign as king,<br>14. The black-headed people, I did rule and govern.<br>15. With copper pickaxes, I did cut my way through the (most) difficult mountains.<br>16. I did ascend all the high mountains,<br>17. I did traverse all the foothills,<br>18. The sealands, I did sail around three times.<br>19. Dilmun did submit to me (?) . . .<br>20. The Great Wall of Heaven and Earth(?), I did ascend.<br>21. [(Its very) st]ones(?), I did remove [. . .I<br>22. Whatever king will arise after me,<br>23. [Let him exercise kingship for x years]!<br>24. Let him rule the black-headed people!<br>25. Let him cut his way through the (most) difficult mountains with copper pickaxes!<br>26. Let him ascend all the high mountains!<br>27. [Let him traverse all the foothills]!<br>28. Let him circumnavigate the sealands three times!<br>29. [Let Dilmun submit to him (?)I!<br>30. Let him ascend to the Great Wall of Heaven and Earth(?)!<br>31. [Let him remove (its) stones. . . I!<br>32. . . . . from my city Akkade.. . .<br>33. . . . . like arrows(?) . . .(break)<br><br>|Joan Goodnick Westenholz, ''Legends of the Kings of Akkade- The Texts''. Eisenbrauns Winona Lake, Indiana 1997, pp. 38 e sgg.}}</ref>.
 
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